Category Archives: Extracurricular/Athletics

Beating Bowdoin

One of the perks of a Colby education is beating Bowdoin. As a junior I’ve been able to personally be a part of the occurrence two times out of three. Last night was the third, at Bowdoin, 11-7. Big win for the Mules, the Boys, the family back at home. And most importantly the fans.

Last time we beat Bowdoin, it was at home and it was a great feeling. But last night was probably the last time I’ll play at Bowdoin, so winning in the pouring rain was the way to do it. Unfortunately, we’d been coming off a string of tough losses, but when we’re venturing down to Brunswick, it’s not hard to get psyched up on the way down.

The game was pretty even for the first half at 4-4. And I’m not a sportswriter, but the Mules came flying out in the second half like we’d accidentally ended up in the Preakness. The momentum was unstoppable and when the skies parted and the clouds cleared, we stood victorious on the only other Astroturf field in the NESCAC besides our very own Bill Alfond field.

After chatting with the fans and the family, we made our way into the hockey arena where our locker room was and sang our alma mater inside the rink. Top notch day.

One more win against Bates and we’ll get the CBB (Colby Bates Bowdoin). Whichever team beats both other teams gets this honor. To my knowledge, it’s been at least five years since any one of our three teams have been able to do so. For now just know it’s a great time beating Bowdoin. And it’ll be an even better time beating Bates.

About Jeb Waters

Hey, I am a junior originally from Connecticut, now living in Maine, although I live off campus currently. I am a Philosophy major with a minor in Administrative Science. I also play lacrosse at Colby and am a member of Mayflower Hill Capital. In my free time, I run a music blog, get down to the gym to play squash or go on adventures around Maine.
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Spring Break

After an 11 hour bus ride, I’ve never been quite so happy to see exit 127 in all my life. The lacrosse team has just returned from its spring break trip to the greater Baltimore region. We just spent the past week making our way down to Annapolis and finally have made our way back.

Our first stop for Spring break was Connecticut College for a game Saturday and then we hopped right back on our coach bus for another five-hour drive down south. Or, at least south compared to Waterville or New London. Granted, the weather wasn’t too much warmer than we’re used to, but the change of scenery was great.

We visited the area surrounding The Naval Academy, practiced at The Severn School, went to the US Lacrosse Hall of Fame, and played at Johns Hopkins. But most importantly we had a lot of time to decompress. The second season starts free time becomes fairly nonexistent, so having no class or homework to do is a serious weight off the shoulders.

If you’re a spring athlete, you probably already know what this is like, but I don’t think I’ve had a non-sports related spring break in about 6 years. That’s just the way it is. There are some sacrifices to be made, but getting to road trip with the team is definitely worth it.

Of course, it’s always great to get closer to school and see the snow piles stacked up around the field. It wouldn’t be almost April in Maine if the snow wasn’t still here.

About Jeb Waters

Hey, I am a junior originally from Connecticut, now living in Maine, although I live off campus currently. I am a Philosophy major with a minor in Administrative Science. I also play lacrosse at Colby and am a member of Mayflower Hill Capital. In my free time, I run a music blog, get down to the gym to play squash or go on adventures around Maine.
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Trials and Tribulations

It’s Doghead Eve and I’m in the library. Lax season. I’ve never been to a Doghead personally, so I can only speak from impersonal experience.  I hear it’s pretty sweet.

If you’re a spring athlete, this is your Friday night before exam season. The only difference between us and the rest of the population tomorrow afternoon is that our dehydration comes from us having spent two hours on the field. And that is why we play. I suppose the biggest party of the year would be fun to go to, but even D3 sports involve sacrifices. I think we’re all fine with that. But if you’re not a spring athlete, there’s quite a bit of fun to be had.

So for those who don’t play, and this is all hearsay of course, but here goes: 10 pm is usually too early. This is no normal Friday night. It’s best to wait until past midnight to begin your festivities. From then until sunrise people wander, enjoy the reverie and well, I don’t quite know. But then before the sun begins its ascent over the Colby quad, most everyone on campus gathers on the steps of Miller library to watch the sunrise.

Post-this, breakfast is served in Dana. Some people can’t handle anymore and head in, but the festivities carry into the day, at least for those brave souls. Around midday, fatigue sets in, beds become welcoming and we spring athletes take the field.

 

 

 

About Jeb Waters

Hey, I am a junior originally from Connecticut, now living in Maine, although I live off campus currently. I am a Philosophy major with a minor in Administrative Science. I also play lacrosse at Colby and am a member of Mayflower Hill Capital. In my free time, I run a music blog, get down to the gym to play squash or go on adventures around Maine.
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On Billy A

With lacrosse season in full swing, some people might be wondering what it’s like to be an outdoor athlete here. There are days we can play outside, but there are also a lot of days we have to play indoors or practice half and half.

For men and women’s lacrosse we only have one field to play on despite the other turf field. The astro turf might be a bit wearing on the knees, but it is an advantage for our home games. Similarly, when it is too cold to play we play in the field house or have to do some drills on the basketball court. Hopefully, one day we’ll have turf in our field house, but for now we can just visit the museum.

Luckily, we aren’t the baseball team though. They play on grass, so their outdoor season doesn’t start for quite a while after ours. Perspective counts.

Other than the weather and field restraints, being an outdoor athlete requires warmth. We wear a lot of sweats, but 40 degrees is nice and toasty. Plus, your body learns to adapt – and playing in the snow is pretty cool.

Because it’s cold all the time, we have to use the training room quite a bit. Whether it’s rolling out, getting some therapy or massage from the trainers or taking an ice bath, we have to be recovered and recuperated to deal with the cold we play in.

If it all works out, the weather is warm enough and we get to play outdoors – it’s marvelous. When you get the top of the hill, there’s nothing like a day up on Billy A. Nothing else I need to say.

About Jeb Waters

Hey, I am a junior originally from Connecticut, now living in Maine, although I live off campus currently. I am a Philosophy major with a minor in Administrative Science. I also play lacrosse at Colby and am a member of Mayflower Hill Capital. In my free time, I run a music blog, get down to the gym to play squash or go on adventures around Maine.
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Snowed In — Part 1: the adventures

Ah, snow.

When I am old and wrinkly, I will fondly remember Colby as the snow covered wonderland where students built snowman in JanPlan and little cardboard red hearts on Valentine. I will remember the warmth of hot chocolate on the Street, and tiny snowflakes that covered the roofs like powdered sugar on ginger bread houses. For now, I will struggle through the knee deep sludge to class while avoiding the icy slopes of death.

Colby is covered in snow around five months of the year. When spring rolls around, there will still be stubborn mounds of snow that has been seasoned to rock-hard ice bricks, refusing to melt away, as if judging your willingness to shed the large puffy coats and wearing sleeveless.

With snow comes lots of fun activities. I have heard tales of cross-country skiing (I have no clue what that is), sledding (it counts when I did it with lunch trays, right?), snow shoeing (that just sounds like what I do everyday to school, but made fancy), and (normal? regular?) skiing. Fun fact: I did skied once and it was amusing when you get the gist of it; when I was learning and skiing down the slope with the speed of a turtle fearing for a icy death, it was amusing to others. Especially the kids.

Being less of an outdoorsy person, I enjoy quieter, less deadly activities. I love going to Boston on the weekends to have hotpot in Chinatown with my friends; there is something soothing seeing beef and veggies and tofu and seafood bubbling in a delicious stew. Since it turns dark at around 5:00pm during the cold months, I usually could not fight the urge to curl up on my comfy chair (which I got in the Rescue Sale for $8) and read while nursing a hot cup of tea. Hot beverages are the God’s reward for freezing cold, so I indulge in hot chai, apple cider, coffee, tea, matcha latte, and everything else.

One of my favorite things to do is to take a hot mug of tea and walk to the bench in front of the Alumni Center in the middle of the night. Staring at the blue light of Miller reminds me of the beauty of Mayflower Hill, and memories over four years in Colby.

The second semester is always busy for me; I tend to overestimate my ability, or I like to think that  I am inherently a daredevil who loves a challenge. There are many sleepless nights, so perhaps my favorite winter moments are sitting in front of Runnals after a long night and watching the sky turns from Indian ink blue, to a rich royal purple, a fiery red, tangerine, and finally a crisp blue of a winter morning. The bird chimes and another Colby morning has broken, bringing another day of adventures.

 

 

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Dawn at Dawn

 

January is finally cooling down and preseason is finally heating up. We’re three weeks into Jan Plan and three weeks away from the start of our season. Lacrosse officially begins February 15, but Jan Plan is the perfect time to amplify the training.

In the fall, we have captain’s practice twice a week, lifts, and some speed and agility type classes. But the second Jan Plan starts, things really get going. We have a lift three days a week. Two speed classes. Three practices. One work capacity. Things get a little hectic. The legs feel like a pair of cinderblocks. By the end of Jan Plan we’ll be well-oiled machines. Division III athletes ready to practice and play in sub-freezing temperatures.

Today itself marks the end of an era. Dawn, our absolute legend of a trainer, hosted the class of 2014’s last work capacity class. The session is usually filled with men and women’s spring sports looking to raise their lactic acid tolerance. Some might call the class a doozy, we just call it Dawn. It consists of several high intensity work stations paired with sprints. Each section has three 30 second components and we get a water break every once in a while.

I may still have another year of Dawn workouts left, but today, the spring sport seniors finished up with a couple of enjoyable relay sprints. Finishing a class is always rewarding. Finishing a career of work capacity classes must feel great. Friday afternoons are always tough, but they’re a great way to finish the week and of course, we always make sure to say thank you.

So here’s to Dawn and the end of work capacity. Until next fall.

About Jeb Waters

Hey, I am a junior originally from Connecticut, now living in Maine, although I live off campus currently. I am a Philosophy major with a minor in Administrative Science. I also play lacrosse at Colby and am a member of Mayflower Hill Capital. In my free time, I run a music blog, get down to the gym to play squash or go on adventures around Maine.
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Expectations vs. Reality

What we expect in life is often different from reality. For example, I fully expect myself to grow into a towering 6 feet tall when I was a little kid.

In reality I achieved an astounding 5 feet. Well, if you come to think of it, I did attained 5/6 of my goal, which is not that bad. I do have some difficulties reaching most things though.

As a senior, it is pretty interesting to compare what I expected and what I actually achieved in my four years. Here are some of them:

Expectation:

I expect that I am going to get ALL As in my classes. Like, I won’t even be able to deal with an A-. I was that crazy person.

(This is adapted from this post in (the awesome) Hyperbole and a Half: http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/06/this-is-why-ill-never-be-adult.html)

Reality:

Well, I did not get all As in my classes; I have my fair share of less glamorous grades. What I can say with confidence is that I had dabbled in a wide variety of classes, and that I tried my best in all of them while juggling with my campus and off campus jobs. I leant a lot and definitely made Colby my own experience.

Expectations:

Join all the clubs! Especially during my first semester, I signed up for so many different things in the Club Expo. I ended up darting across campus, jumping from one event to the other. (I still do that sometime)

Reality:

Reality is a stone cold bitch. The truth is you just don’t have that much time in your life to do every single thing. I realize that I am human (despite suspicions that I am actually a cat: I have a looming dark side, and I love napping, warmth, and condensed milk), and I would rather be more engaged in select activities and be truly immersed, rather than being burdened by everything.

Expectation:

I will eat like a rabbit, and exercise like a hyper puppy. I will be ripped.

*excessive carrots will turn you yellowish orange

RIPPED! Werewolf ripped.

Reality:

Who am I kidding? I love food, and food loves me. There are few things in life more magical than sharing a 2am pizza with my friends, and cooking is like magic. Think about it, you are taking chucks of muscles, plants, roots, and put them through death and fire. You end up with complex and flavorful dishes that brings the world together. I mean, have you even notice how many of insideColby blog posts are about food? A LOT. Check the front page; it is like 4 out of 5.

I try to be healthier by buying spinach and adding it to most things I eat. I make salads some times.

Other times I am just lazy and eat junk food the whole day.

I also go to the gym once in a while. In warmer days, I walk to most of my destinations. If you see a tiny Chinese person walking to Shaws, it is probably me.

Expectation:

I will have a schedule that I follow to the point. To. The. Minute.

Reality:

Yeah, right. The thing is, I do keep a schedule, but there are things that you cannot plan. For example, during freshman year I had this one schedule where I planned when I will socialize, which is sort of ridiculous when you think about it; I planed to the hour when I would go and talk to my friends. Sometimes you just have to go out of that little blue schedule book and seek adventure. Live a little, enjoy the surprises.

Carpe diem.

I am happy to say that my four years in Colby are probably not what I expected, but the reality is so much funner and more awesome beyond my imagination.

 

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Dealing with stress, chilling in Colby

Gah! The past month has been quite the roller coaster ride. First of all, there are classes, then the tests and exams, then the presentations, and the applications. but fear not, I am going to tell you about some of the ways that you can fight with stress in Colby.

  1. Have a picnic by the pond. Just pack some sandwiches, take some fruits from the dinning hall , and a good book. The walk to the Johnson pond is beautiful, and you can imagine that you are one of those happy people in a Renoir painting when the sunshine filters through the leaves.
  2. Go on a road trip! Rent a Zipcar. Also, the Concord Coach runs through Colby everyday, and you can go from Colby to the world (if you have a lot of money). Or you can just go around Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. You can go to Boston for the weekend, and have a great hotpot buffet lunch in Chinatown, window shop at the Prudential, and have fro-yo/ cupcakes/ chocolates. If you haven’t notice, most of my trips involve food. Speaking of which …
  3. Cook some food! Yes! There are kitchens in most dorms where you can cook and enjoy a meal with your friends! Just decide on who is going to do the dishes later to avoid the passive aggressive moaning on the couch.
  4. Take a nap. I know when you are in the midst of everyday, sleep seems like a luxury, but YOU NEED SLEEP. Trust me I am a senior. An hour nap goes a looooong way.
  5. Hit the gym. There is wi-fi in the gym, so you can watch Louie on Netflix while attempting to run. Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy. Happy people just don’t shoot their husbands, they just don’t.
  6. Join an activity. Do something that you believe matters. For me, right now I am involved in Campus Conversations About Race, and there is nothing that makes me happier in having meaningful conversations and putting them into action.
  7. Talk to your professors. Your professors are your friend. Tell them what is bothering you, you will be surprised how much they can help. My professors had been my rock.
  8. DON’T PANIC. I mean it in this way: it is normal to panic, but don’t let it get to your head. Scream into your pillow, then know this: sometimes you just need to go through this one week. Take it day by day, and make a good schedule. Know that doing your best will be the best you can do, and asking anything else will be ridiculous. Cut yourself some slack, my friend.
Any suggestions on how to deal with stress? What is your favorite way to chill on campus?
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So Why Waterville? — Part 2

This summer was the summer that I got to really know Maine. Yes, I went to Colby for three years (well, granted, I was in Copenhagen for a semester), but there are times when the Hill seems distant and removed from the outside world. There is so much happening at school, so many people to meet, so many things to do, so much to learn, that I forgot that there is a larger world outside this comfortable bubble.

It happens to the best of us, or at least I try to comfort myself by saying that.

My neighbor really opened my eyes to what Maine is like during the decades of his life, and in a way, I saw the changes and constants through the lifetime of a local.

My neighbor grew up in South China, and he drove me to the town that he grew up. The sunlight filtered through the rows of trees, and we passed by the house where his aunt still live in, and the farmhouse where he used to work as a child. His brothers and sisters and him used to wake up in the crack of dawn and chop firewood right at that spot, and they would go to school in that little white house. My neighbor would come home and his mom would have made forty biscuits, and he would be so hungry that he could eat a whole bowl of mashed potatoes. 

As a teenager he is rebellious, much as most of us. He tells me his crazy stories as we drove around. He told me how he would work if he lost his license, and I laughed and told him that I walked everywhere, but that is because I don’t have a car.

My neighbor drove me to Augusta, and he used to drive this highway two times a week to go to work in Connecticut. My neighbor said that those long drives really makes him bored, and he likes to drive as fast as he can. I would joke and tell him to keep us alive and please drive safe. Another day, we drove by the factory that he worked for two decades; I walked among the beams that weight more than a ton, and every single beam was made by people like my neighbor, from 5 am until night. My neighbor takes a lot of pride in his work.

I really like going to his old house and visit his son and future daughter in law. They had two great huskies: the older one is calm and collected and loves attention, the younger one is energetic and talkative and steals attention. His future daughter in law would talk me on a four-wheeler ride around, and then we would have a great big bonfire. Over the soft crackle of the logs, my neighbor told me how he saved up his money and bought this piece of land. He cleared the trees himself, and built the house brick by brick, plank by plank.

My neighbor also took me fishing. I was pretty lousy at it, catching only two tiny, tiny trout that I ended up releasing. My neighbor had children when he was fairly young, but he told me, from the moment he held his first son, he knew that he wanted to be a good father. We rode around for half a day trying to find the exact same spot where he used to take his sons camping, hunting and fishing, but we ended up having sore backs from the rocky roads. There is something about nature of Maine that is just beautiful. There was this other family, a guy was teaching two little children how to cast the fishing line; you could see the line where the water meets the sky, and the water was clear and you could see the fishes swimming between the rocks. I tried to imagine a new childhood for me, a childhood where I went fishing instead of window-shopping.

At night, we cooked the fishes that were caught, and also some deer meet that was hunted by his future daughter in law’s father. My neighbor’s son would come to his apartment and ask for pasta and meat sauce. My neighbor said that his son knows how to cook pasta, but his son said, “I just don’t make them like you do.”

Why Maine? Why Waterville? I don’t really know when I was an underclassman. I thought it was Colby, or the beautiful sceneries, but this summer I think it was because of passionate people like my neighbor. In my Zumba class yesterday, my instructor told me how much she enjoyed helping everyone get in shape, in my Hospice training class, a women told me how much she loved doing art to beautify the town. Yes, Waterville is a small town, and Maine is a very cold state in the winter, but what attract me about a place have always been the people, and the memories and experiences of these people about the place.

 

P.S.: I did not draw a picture because I am just not good enough to draw pictures about my feelings in this article. I guess this is why I like to write; I want to paint pictures with my words instead. But there you go, I included something for you. This is a drawing of my friend’s beautiful and smart and gentle and funny cat that passed away recently. My friend’s cat is called Doc, and he is as awesome as The Doctor.

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On The Pitch

It might be the middle of midterm week, but iPlay season has just begun. And after a scheduling error last week, my team is ready to go.

Under the lights on Billy A (the Bill Alfond lacrosse and field hockey field) or the Harold Alfond football field students battle it out in flag football or soccer throughout the fall. The prize for winning it all is a beautiful cotton tee shirt. I’ve come as close as the championship game in soccer, but a tee shirt commemorating my team’s blood, sweat and tears still eludes me.  But winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing. Or so the tee shirt says.

But in actuality it isn’t the only thing. iPlay is about taking a break from studying between 6-9 once a week, so you can break a sweat. For some, it’s a fun way to be on a team if you don’t play a sport in another season. For others, myself included, it’s a much more fun way to stay in shape out of season rather than just running sprints. The teams usually consist of about 15 to 20 players, but due to scheduling conflicts, the showings are usually a bit smaller. This allows for everyone to get a chance to play. It doesn’t matter how good or bad at soccer or flag football you are. I haven’t played competitive soccer in four years, but nobody cares –it’s just fun to be out on the pitch once a week. And of course we’re still trying to win it all.

About Jeb Waters

Hey, I am a junior originally from Connecticut, now living in Maine, although I live off campus currently. I am a Philosophy major with a minor in Administrative Science. I also play lacrosse at Colby and am a member of Mayflower Hill Capital. In my free time, I run a music blog, get down to the gym to play squash or go on adventures around Maine.
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