Category Archives: Extracurricular/Athletics

No class today! Welcome to Maine~

First time since January 9, 1998, Colby will be closed because of the weather. Though I’m pretty happy about not having class today and have a break after 2 hours of basketball yesterday, I do want to go and watch Selma.

Our class is supposed to go and watch Selma together at 2:30pm. However, because of the weather, it’s cancelled :( For the class discussion, I even prepared 6 questions for the film, Selma. Nevermind, I’m sure I will go and watch it during weekends!!

The photo attached is the view of my room. I didn’t close the window, so I could actually feel the strong wind and snow splashed on my face.  I immediately close the window.

I wish I could take a better photo of the snow and the wind, but I’m too lazy and too scared of walking out of Hillside. My neighbours went for breakfast this morning, and they said it was horrible. Haha, I guess I’d better stay indoor for the whole day today!

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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Almost the end of January

Jan plan is almost over…one more week left :)

Since we only have one class in January, I have a lot more time to do other stuff that I am interested in. I went to play basketball on Sunday with my friends and it was awesome! I used to play basketball when I was in elementary school, but with the increasing work in school and my devotion in music, I sort of gave up basketball.

I am really glad that Colby Jan plan gave me this little break to explore things to do in Colby. Next week, my class (20th Cross-cultural Representation of Prisons) is going to watch Selma in the cinema. Hahaha, proud to be a mule!!! With a Colby Card, we can watch Selma for free. (P.S I heard that the movie is very touching)

Tomorrow morning, I am going to Mirukuya, a great Japanese restaurant near Colby. Such a nice break!!! Next week, we’re gonna go to Johnson Pond for iceskating.

Aww..love Colby weather and Colby life!

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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Mindfulness and Skiing

Now that I am taking a class called Mindfulness and Meditation, I should probably be trying to live mindfully. As I love skiing every second I can in January at the Loaf, what better way to add mindfulness into my life than on the mountain. Oftentimes, when the sun is out and the weather is temperate, thoughts cloud into my mind about how good of a day it is and how it might be the best day we’ve had, etcetera. Or if it’s cloudy and snowing and freezing, I’ll consider how many more runs I will tolerate before my hands begin to go numb and I need to go inside.

Enter mindfulness. Going up King Pine on the far left of the mountain, the sun radiates a golden light that misses the trail below, but hits the top of the trees and spans out across the rest of the valley beyond the mountain. Attempting to be mindful on the mountain has made skiing a little more enjoyable, no? So often, thoughts intrude that make me miss what I am actually at the mountain for. I rip down the snow (or ice) and then sit on the chairlift talking with my friends or going over various thoughts in my head. But being mindful forces me into what is actually going on instead of plastering thoughts onto whatever is going on. I can enjoy the mountain itself and be with each turn I make on the mountain. Can’t complain about that.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Sunday Snowy Sunday

How long, how long will I be gone? Because tonight, I’m going up to Sunday River. For the first time. Dated 12/31/14.

Follow up post. 1/1/15. Sunday River is an entirely different beast than Sugarloaf. While Sugarloaf only has one peak, because it is, you guessed it, one mountain. Sunday River on the other hand has 8 peaks. Therefore, instead of going higher and higher to ski different trails, you can make your way over and across throughout the day. Conditions were chilly, but expected and the morning of January 1st is a great time to ski if you get up before everyone else.

Because Sunday River is so much bigger than Sugarloaf, I literally had no idea where I was the whole time. This is great for finding tons of different trails, but not so great for getting lost from your skiing partner(s). Don’t forget to tell them you need to buckle your boots off the chairlift!

Speaking of chairlifts, Sunday River also has something I’d never seen before: The Chondola! Part chairlift, part gondola, The Chondola! It is a six man chairlift like you would imagine, but then every so often, not that I bothered to count or do research, a gondola arrives. Therefore, the lines are split into those going towards the chairlift and those who would rather ride the gondola. I tried both, and they were both magical experiences that transcended me above the base lodge to a higher level of mountain, ski terrain and consciousness. I only hope, those of you reading can one day make the journey.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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The Medicine Game

Last night, the lacrosse team and Professor Dan Tortora hosted a viewing of the movie “The Medicine Game”. The film follows the life of two of the Thompson brothers in the Onondaga Nation as they seek to play lacrosse at Syracuse University.

If you are familiar with lacrosse, you probably know of the two younger Thompson brothers who were co-winners of the Tewaarton Trophy for best lacrosse player. This film includes them, but focuses on the two older brothers’ journey towards playing at Syracuse. However, the film is not just limited to lacrosse, but to what it means to be a Native American lacrosse player and the obstacles that lay in the path of a college education.

The two brothers, Hiana and Jeremy encounter a multitude of obstacles living on their reservation. When they transfer into the American public school system, they are years behind and cannot read or write in English. Even as they catch up, they do not have the SAT scores to attend Syracuse and must attend Onondaga Community College after they graduate. Hiana ends up not finishing and Jeremy takes three years to finally get to Syracuse, struggling with alcoholism for a short time.

Through the grim outlook that this film offers, our team got a chance to see how lacrosse is doing in the very place that it originated. Unfortunately, life on a reservation is not generous to those who may wish to play lacrosse outside the reservation and at the same time, there is a giant culture clash. Their way of life represented in their traditions, culture and status within America, appears to not mesh neatly with the modern day American lifestyle.

This documentary does a good job of opening up the issues that arise between reservations and modern-day America. As lacrosse has become such a massive game over the past thirty years, hopefully filming these issues through the lens of lacrosse will help it gain a wide audience. Check out more here: http://themedicinegame.com/

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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An Oak Fellow Lecture

There are many cliché phrases about college and this is one of them: “I wish I had attended more lectures when I was still in school.” And like many cliché conversations about clichés, it happens to be true. While I heard this phrase from someone who’s son went somewhere long before I came to school, I unfortunately forgot it until the other night. My girlfriend’s professor had said it to her in class, and as I was not planning on going to a lecture, but instead to pub night, my girlfriend used the phrase convincingly enough that I realized she was right.

While I may have gone a bit begrudgingly, like many things in life, once I heard the talk, I was glad I went. The speaker was a lady from Uganda named Clare Byarugaba. Her speech, which follows from her line of work was Combating Homophobia: The Struggle Against Uganda’s Anti-Gay Law. During her talk, she discussed what it is like to be LGBT in Uganda and how homophobia has become an institutionalized aspect of Uganda itself. Her story was pretty incredible. Besides facing discrimination for being homosexual, she has faced scrutiny, violence and outright rejection.

However, she is now at Colby as the 2014 Oak Fellow for Human Rights, so the attendees of her talk were able to hear her story. Each year, Colby has one person who is doing unbelievable good in the world for human rights and this year, Clare was named the fellow. The Oak Fellow teaches, gives talks and does research during his or her time at Colby. And luckily, I got to see Clare talk about her story and the work she is doing. I’m happy I didn’t pass up the chance to see her speak.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Mayflower Hill Capital

Captionless Image

Outside of being a student, playing lacrosse and writing for insideColby, I have just enough time for a few other commitments. One of these is Mayflower Hill Capital. Started by Andy Vandenberg in his junior year at Colby, Mayflower Hill Capital (MHC) is a student run investment fund. The goal of the club is to learn how to invest by actually doing it. While taking classes on the economy, government, finance and business is great to understand frameworks, MHC gives its twenty members a chance to gain practical experience in investing.

Upon joining the club, members must buy a share and become a partner. Each week, we meet for an hour in which we have a market update and then a stock pitch. Whoever is pitching must send out a one page stock summary before presenting so everyone can gain a sense of the stock and check the company out. There is a standard PowerPoint presentation given, questions are asked and then the club decides whether to purchase a given company. In order to acquire the stock it must pass with a 66% percent approval. If passed, we set parameters on the stock and then it goes into our E-trade account the next morning. Once a stock is passed, the member who pitched the stock must remain up to date and give us weekly updates on how the stock is doing until we decide to sell.

Our investment thesis splits sixty-five percent of our portfolio into medium to long term opportunistic holdings in market leaders while thirty-five percent of our assets are invested in riskier investments that we think have a chance for large growth opportunities. While we are obviously all still in college and by no means market gurus, we are gaining hands on experience by looking at diversified assets and actually pitching stocks. The whole point of the club is to really gain fundamentals and serious interest in investing, so regardless of whether a stock does well or poorly we continue to learn as individuals and as a group.

The club is now entering its second year and we have had our first turnover in leadership. As we continue into the fall we will accept new members through an interview process. I’ll be in for one more year and then sell my shares to a new member. Hopefully the club continues to grow, and while we have no more meetings this semester, I’m looking forward to next fall already.

For more information check out www.mayflowerhillcapital.com

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Home away from Home — Dinner at Cito’s

It is tough to start college, and being in a new country does not make it any better. However, Cito Cruz knows the best way to cure homesickness is through the stomach. Every Friday, Cruz and his wife, Sue, will make enough home-cooked food to feed fifty , and drives international students and their friends to his home for a big meal. Some students will be deep in conversation and enjoying chicken teriyaki and miso soup, while others are playing games and laughing out loud. “There’s something about the house gives it a very homely atmosphere” explained Cruz.

Students know their ways around Cruz’s house; they would pull out the foldable table and chairs one they arrived, Cruz’s three-legged dog would be greeted and stroked; she had a content expressions that say, “Welcome back, old friends.” “Ladies first!” Cruz would shout when the food is ready, and students would hurry and grab the plates and folk and eagerly wait in line.

Cruz, who have been hosting these dinners around the world for more than thirty years, knows how tough it being an international student can be. “I was a foreign student myself long ago; nothing compares to [the crave of] food, hot sauce and rice.” Cruz was also in a host family, like many of Colby’s international students. His host family once drove 150 miles to take care of Cruz, who literally got sick from missing home; back then, a letter took at least two weeks to reach his family, and making a phone call was expensive. Cruz’s host family gave him the master bedroom and slept in the basement for a week. He loved his host family, and decided to share the same kindness with Colby’s international students. He became a host family when his family moved to Maine because of his wife’s career, and also because of his intentions to write and publishes books. He brought a house by a lake; one of his main considerations when he brought the house was that it needed to be big enough to accommodate the students he would invite.

Being a faithful Christian, Cruz see his actions as his devotion to God, which prompt him to love his neighbors as his own; also, with his children all off to college, cooking for the student is just like cooking for his children  once again.

“There’s something about food that bonds people together,” said Cruz. In Cruz’s house, you can see international students and American students working together to win a game of Pictionary. “For the international students, it [international dinner] makes them easier to simulate into the American culture; for the American students, it raises their awareness of other cultures,” said Cruz.

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Beating Bowdoin

One of the perks of a Colby education is beating Bowdoin. As a junior I’ve been able to personally be a part of the occurrence two times out of three. Last night was the third, at Bowdoin, 11-7. Big win for the Mules, the Boys, the family back at home. And most importantly the fans.

Last time we beat Bowdoin, it was at home and it was a great feeling. But last night was probably the last time I’ll play at Bowdoin, so winning in the pouring rain was the way to do it. Unfortunately, we’d been coming off a string of tough losses, but when we’re venturing down to Brunswick, it’s not hard to get psyched up on the way down.

The game was pretty even for the first half at 4-4. And I’m not a sportswriter, but the Mules came flying out in the second half like we’d accidentally ended up in the Preakness. The momentum was unstoppable and when the skies parted and the clouds cleared, we stood victorious on the only other Astroturf field in the NESCAC besides our very own Bill Alfond field.

After chatting with the fans and the family, we made our way into the hockey arena where our locker room was and sang our alma mater inside the rink. Top notch day.

One more win against Bates and we’ll get the CBB (Colby Bates Bowdoin). Whichever team beats both other teams gets this honor. To my knowledge, it’s been at least five years since any one of our three teams have been able to do so. For now just know it’s a great time beating Bowdoin. And it’ll be an even better time beating Bates.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Spring Break

After an 11 hour bus ride, I’ve never been quite so happy to see exit 127 in all my life. The lacrosse team has just returned from its spring break trip to the greater Baltimore region. We just spent the past week making our way down to Annapolis and finally have made our way back.

Our first stop for Spring break was Connecticut College for a game Saturday and then we hopped right back on our coach bus for another five-hour drive down south. Or, at least south compared to Waterville or New London. Granted, the weather wasn’t too much warmer than we’re used to, but the change of scenery was great.

We visited the area surrounding The Naval Academy, practiced at The Severn School, went to the US Lacrosse Hall of Fame, and played at Johns Hopkins. But most importantly we had a lot of time to decompress. The second season starts free time becomes fairly nonexistent, so having no class or homework to do is a serious weight off the shoulders.

If you’re a spring athlete, you probably already know what this is like, but I don’t think I’ve had a non-sports related spring break in about 6 years. That’s just the way it is. There are some sacrifices to be made, but getting to road trip with the team is definitely worth it.

Of course, it’s always great to get closer to school and see the snow piles stacked up around the field. It wouldn’t be almost April in Maine if the snow wasn’t still here.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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