Category Archives: Student Life

Almost the end of January

Jan plan is almost over…one more week left :)

Since we only have one class in January, I have a lot more time to do other stuff that I am interested in. I went to play basketball on Sunday with my friends and it was awesome! I used to play basketball when I was in elementary school, but with the increasing work in school and my devotion in music, I sort of gave up basketball.

I am really glad that Colby Jan plan gave me this little break to explore things to do in Colby. Next week, my class (20th Cross-cultural Representation of Prisons) is going to watch Selma in the cinema. Hahaha, proud to be a mule!!! With a Colby Card, we can watch Selma for free. (P.S I heard that the movie is very touching)

Tomorrow morning, I am going to Mirukuya, a great Japanese restaurant near Colby. Such a nice break!!! Next week, we’re gonna go to Johnson Pond for iceskating.

Aww..love Colby weather and Colby life!

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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Hot Dogs in Foss!?

Who ever thought they would see hot dogs in the spot where they usually have walnut burgers? Not I. But I grabbed two of those tasty hot dogs grilled or boiled to perfection, splattered a little ketchup, mustard and relish on them and had a field day. Welcome to Foss in Jan Plan. I still don’t see much of the football team or any of the hockey teams(and not I’m not making generalizations about athletics teams, only the lacrosse team, ski teams, woodsmen and ultimate Frisbee teams seem to make it into Foss) , but it is such a joy to see many  people who would never step foot onto the eastward and westward facing steps into the labyrinth of the Foss dining hall.

So why hot dogs? Well, in Jan plan there are only two dining halls open. Luckily in the two years since I’ve become a Fossil, Foss has been one of the dining halls open. The other one open this year is Dana, and I can’t quite remember, but I imagine it was not open last year while Bobs was. Because Bobs is good friends, good conversation, good food, Bobs, you can imagine the dismay people feel when their favorite Bobby’s Bistro is shut down for a whole month like it was under inspection from the NYC Health Department. It will rise again, but for now Foss has to market itself to those who would prefer not to eat quinoa or risotto. So hot dogs it is! Perhaps, if we’re luckily, those people will keep coming back to Foss even after Bobs opens its doors again come February.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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What is Jan Plan?

After 3 weeks of heaven in Hong Kong, Im back here in Colby College, my another home:)

I took 20th Century Cros  Prison Culture. I took this class because it sounds interesting and it fulfils my literature requirement. Because I arrived late, I had to do 2 extra essays for that week.

Pros and Cons about Jan Plan

Pros:

First, since you are only focusing on one course, so you can devote more time on it. Second, if you choose courses such as Jazz improvisation, you can really develop some practical skills within a month! and if your course is not that demanding, you have a lot of time to play winter sports! The weather is perfect for ice skating in Johnson’s Pond as well haha!

Cons:

However, it might get a little bit redundant after the first week since you are having the same class EVERYDAY. Also, there are quite a lot of readings and writings because its an intensive course.

I would say whether or not you like Jan Plan depends on what type of person you are. I enjoy my class a lot, but  Choose something that you are really passionate about would be my advice.

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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What’s Cooler Than Being Cool?

Ice Cold! Alright, today was a mindnumbingly -2 degrees outside our adobe we call the Alfond Apartments. Luckily it didn’t quite feel like the -17 degrees that Sugarloaf felt like. Balmy and I still don’t understand actual temp, windchill temp and “what it feels like temp”. It always feels worse than it is, that is the sad and profound truth of both temperatures and sometimes life.

So, a couple tips for staying warm in your time of need. First off, make sure you have at least one vest from vest season, one flannel shirt from LL Bean you “obviously” had before you even thought of going to college in Maine, one down jacket, preferable with a hood, and one more windproof jacket. No more, no less. If you have more on than that, you may be at risk to break a sweat at first which seems great because you’re hot. But once the cold starts to wrap it’s fingers around each layer of your warmth, sweat (designed by evolution to cool you down), is a problem. Now you’re even colder. If you have less on than that then you are at risk for several things. No flannel means you won’t be warm inside. No vest means your vital organs are at risk for lower temps. No down jacket means, well no warmth on the arms either. And finally, we go to school on Mayflower Hill, which is coincidentally, a hill cleared of many of its trees. Thus, and I just made that argument up, gusts of wind rush around campus like the second semester has already begun. You better have something windproof for that.

Now that we have the upper layers covered, let’s head south. It comes down to three vital items. Cords. Alt sweatpants. Onesies/long johns. Cords are the perfect I look nice, but I’m actually pretty much wearing sweatpants with buttons. These are great for wearing outside with your four layers of top clothing. Alt sweatpants are primo in my rulebook. They weren’t previously, but then they arrived in the mail. Now I can look cool, but stay warm. Finally, onesies and/or long johns. This is where things get tricky. If you’re going skiing, it’s a no brainer. But about and about is where things get difficult. If it’s really so chilly that four levels of upperwear and some corduroys or alt. sweatpants aren’t going to do the trick, well maybe you should stay in your room. And if you’re going to class, all that body movement lets you stay a bit warmer outside walking, but all that speedy gonzalez movement will smack you in the face with indoor heating the second you sit down in class. And let me tell you from experience, sitting in class with all your ski gear on gets pretty toasty. But you make your decisions and I’ll make mine.

For now it’s finally beginning to look a bit like Christmas!

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Back To School

In the immortal words of Adam Sandler: “back to school, to prove to dad that I’m not a fool”. Fortunately, January at Colby is a month in which the proof is in the pudding, not necessarily the academics. It is a month Colby students long for in anticipation. Instead of the standard bah-humbug mentality of a return to school from long days spent in bed binge-watching Game of Thrones, there is a buzz in the air. For winter is coming, and so is Jan Plan. Juniors shall return from abroad. Winter Street shall live again!

This Jan Plan, I am continuing on my divergence from academia during January. Last January, I did an independent study in Yogic Philosophy. This Jan plan, I will be doing Mindfulness and Meditation. Freshman year I participated in Financial Decision Making and sophomore year I did my non-lab science requirement, The Human-Microbe Connection, which was a brief foray into microbiology. The most important philosophy to Jan Plan, in my opinion, is to go outside of what you do the rest of the school year.

Actually, scratch that, my most important philosophy for Jan Plan is to do that, but not at a cost to your ability to ski Sugarloaf as many times during the workweek as possible.

Financial Decision Making was, unfortunately, 4 days a week, but it did not meet until 2 pm. The Human-Microbe Connection began at 1, but was only 3 days a week. However, it was 3 hours long- woah. Last, year I really came into my own and took an independent study. This meant I could ski up to 7 times a week. This year, I only meet 3 times a week, but it is in the morning, meaning I will only be able to ski two days during the workweek and on the weekends. However, I can’t wait, see you in Waterville. Poetic Justice.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Thanksgiving break

While most of students here went back home for Thanksgiving break, some of my friends and I just stayed on campus. I was planning to go to New York City or Boston to meet up my friends, but it just…didn’t happen.

It is pretty convenient to go to Boston or NYC. Colby Students usually take Concord Coach line to Portland Airport, Boston, or any places in Maine. It is around $40 to get to Boston.

Staying on campus for Thanksgiving wasn’t a really bad idea. On the thanksgiving day, my friend, Sohee and I went to our host family’s home for thanksgiving. There were two other families joining us. In total, there were around 14 people. We played card games and had tons of games. Haha, we had two types of turkey: Roasted Turkey, and Fried Turkey. The food was amazing! 

 

I am extremely thankful for the Host family that Colby College arranged. I feel loved and cared. My host family really treats me as part of their family, which makes my Colby experience more meaningful and blessed. On that thanksgiving day, I shout out for my host family, for always supporting me in every way. 

 

 

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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Late Semester Doldrums

You look outside and your stomach growls. It’s so late, how did I miss dinner? Oh, wait. It’s only 4:15 pm, but it’s darker than a solar eclipse. Come November, the hours of sun are rather limited up at Colby. Fortune does not favor those who begin class at 2:30 because when it ends at 3:45, the sun has already begun its descent below Mayflower Hill and the moon has begun to rise above the treeline.

Around this time it’s easy to get the late semester doldrums. You’re either so swamped with your second round of midterms going into Thanksgiving or you finished them up a week ago. On the first hand, you couldn’t be more stressed and on the verge or in the middle of some multi-symptomatic flu/strep psycho-hybrid. On the second hand, you just had that a week ago and the only thing on your agenda is eleven hours of sleep a day until Thanksgiving break. Either way sunlight is not a large factor in anyone’s life. If you’re studying all the time, you’re lucky if you take a study break outside. If you’re catching up on sleep, you probably wake up, go to class and then it’s already dark.

So here are a few tips to beat the doldrums. 1) Vitamin D. Vitamin D is synthesized through the skin from the sun. Ten minutes in the sun gives you approximately 10,000 IU of vitamin D, which is great for your hormones, your happiness levels and overall zest for life. 2) Hope. Hope is synthesized in the brain when Thanksgiving break is right around the corner. Hold on for just a few more days and you’ll be able to sleep 15 hours a day, eat turkey and see friends and family. 3) Drop everything. This is probably not the best advice, but I hear both the Caribbean and the Alps are nice this time of year. Pick your poison. Either way, Jan Plan will be here just after Christmas break!

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Story Time

This past Sunday evening I sat down in front of a hundred or so people in Page Commons to tell them a story from my life. While my story was one of struggle and eventual triumph, I tried to pepper it with humor and good life lessons without becoming cliché or ending up in a long rambling diatribe once my story had ended.

While my story may be unique, this event is not unique to me. Every Sunday evening in Page commons, someone new tells a fascinating story from their life. Milk is served alongside cookies from the local Co-Op in town called Barrels. My cookie choice was molasses-spice, although I never got a chance to eat one this Sunday. People grab their cookies and then gather around to listen.

Usually I am the one listening to speakers present their ideas, so to be on the other side of the stage was a little nerve-wracking. Add to the fact that I had not decided necessarily to present, but had been asked to do so.  The selection process is obscure and anonymous, so someone needs to know about your life and then submit your name to the committee. I knew my story was compelling, but I was definitely having some butterflies before going up on stage. However, once I got going, things fell into place.

I wish I could tell you my story here, but it’s a little long for a blog post and so are the other stories that happen. As they are captivatingly told in such an intimate and sometimes intense setting, I shan’t share, but I can certainly encourage you to attend if you ever happen to be at Colby on a Sunday evening around 9 pm.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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International Food Festival

Isn’t it great to have a taste of different food from different countries? Yesterday, which is a Sunday, we had International Food Festival presented by the International Club in Foss Dining Hall from 12pm to 2pm.

Curry Fish balls

Everyone was very busy with cooking since Friday. For my Hong Kong group, we bought ingredients in Portland, and we started cooking on Saturday afternoon. We reheated the food and prepared the fishball and Hong Kong style egg waffles on Sunday morning. You wouldn’t believe it! The Pugh kitchen was populated by 4 different cultural groups on Sunday morning. Anyways, we still manage to present pork (chasiu), hong kong style waffles, and fishball to the students and faculty members.

Chinese Hotpot!International Food Festival

As you can see from the photo, Foss Dining Hall was super crowded. Great food were gone in a second. The Hong Kong style pork were gone in 30 minutes and our fishballs were very popular as well. The outlet near our table was not working, so we can’t make any waffles in the beginning. We started serving people at around 1:30pm.

 

Onigiri (おにぎり)

Since I was serving the students and faculty members for the whole time, I didn’t have chance to try other groups’ food. I only tried the Japanese’s Onigiri. They are right next to us so I can grab one haha!!! It is extremely delicious and I wish I could have one more!

When I was making the egg waffles in Pugh Kitchen, Dalia, a student from Jordan, was baking. I was watching her for the entire process but I didn’t even have a chance to try her food :(

The International Food Festival was so successful, and it really makes me proud of my identity as a Hongkonger/Hongkongese. I am definitely gonna join next year! <3

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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Pizza In the Morning

“Pizza in the evening, pizza at suppertime.” So goes the acclaimed ballad of Bagel Bites, etched into my mind by Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon and the Disney channel during my childhood.

For the long time followers out there (thanks Mom and Dad!) you may know of my exploits into the fine culinary arts in my off campus house last year. Last year, we made dashing meals of roast chicken, butter and maple syrup doused squash, and frying pans full of potatoes, onions and peppers simmered in olive oil. But there’s another, darker side to that story.

Once you live in the senior apartments, like I do now, or off-campus, like I did last year, you have access to a kitchen and your meal plan is reduced to 100 meals per semester. And while I may I have blogged of the finer side of eating, there does, in this world, exist the food budget. Sometimes, on a fine weekend evening you can eat like a king in all its majestic trappings. But then one must become resourceful. In the off campus food budget by Jeb Waters, there are 6 constant food groups: Bagel Bites, Ramen Noodles, Annie’s pasta, local eggs, bacon, and oatmeal. All vegetables and fruits are reserved for lunch in Foss, eaten in the form of a salad or one of their delicious soup du jours.

The food budget pyramid does a wonderful job of keeping one satisfied around the clock. You get healthy proteins: whey in the milk proteins of cheese in bagel bites and Annie’s pasta, and of course the egg whites. Healthy fats in the egg yolks and bacon. Minerals and vitamins in ramen mix-in powder mix and egg yolks. And, of course, a copious of amount complex starchy carbohydrates to keep the energy levels up and running. Eating on a budget can be fun and creative. Who knows if you’ll get pepperoni or cheese Bagel Bites or which flavor Annie’s you’ll choose! Either way, you’ll never be disappointed if you stick to the basic food budget groups. 4-hour chef? Try 5-minutes, Mr. Ferris.

 

 

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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