Category Archives: Student Life

Do I live in Bixler?

As I am planning to take Music as my minor, I enrolled in MU181 (Music Theory) and MU193, which is piano lesson. I also take Music and Gender as my first year Writing course. Therefore, literally from Monday to Friday I have class in Bixler haha!!!

Before I applied to Colby, I saw on the fiske guide that Colby’s music is pretty good. Indeed, the department is smaller than I thought, but the professors here are all great and passionate. Also, since the department is small, I get to know almost all the professors, not even mentioning I have just been here for 2 months haha (Oh, its exactly 2 months! I came here on Aug 22nd) time flies…..

The music department always offers me opportunities to learn and improve. I already had a performance class 3 weeks ago, and I will have a master class coming soon in 2 weeks. I also joined the jazz piano teaching session, and that was how I got into the jazz band as a pianist. I still couldn’t believe the fact that I just came here for 2 months.

Do I live in Bixler? Yes, I do. I am always in the piano rooms. There are 4 grand piano rooms for practising, and around 4-5 practise rooms with one to two upright pianos. Two upright pianos are for piano ensemble. I’m very looking forward to that as well!! Haha, so much fun~~

I hope that my 4 years in Colby can mold me into not only a knowledgable and astute student, but also a versatile student. That’s what liberal art college is about, right? :)

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
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Family Homecoming -Family

It’s Family Homecoming Weekend!

A time when our parents and guardians can visit us and get a glimpse of the lives we are living.

That is unless your parents aren’t coming because of distance, work etc.

So…what are these students supposed to do? As a first year student I have been slightly homesick and  the plethora of families visiting is not really helping.

But, hey cheer up I say to myself and others. There are plenty of things to do this weekend without parents.

Today for instance you can go to the Foss dining hall at 6pm to witness the World Food Day Cooking Challenge. In fact, I’ll be participating ! Four teams trying to wow five judges with a culmination of taste, design, and creativity. If you want to know what my team is making be sure to drop by.

Tomorrow, the Colby Outing Club will be going on a hike to Mt. Phillips. I really wanted to go but cannot. I will be engaging prospective students and their families tomorrow as an Admissions Ambassador.  Always a refreshing experience to see the doe-eyed prospies and guide them along the path I was on about a year ago.

Sometimes its hard not being able to return to my parent’s side at a moments notice. Fortunately, I feel like I am starting to find my own niche at Colby. Its almost like the faculty and my peers are becoming my second family.

We all yearn to find our home and I have found a new one at Colby.

About Tanvir

I am a first year student interested in the biological sciences. In addition to being a blogger, I am a research assistant in the biology department and a writer for the Colby Echo. In my free time I play table tennis and billiards. As someone born and raised in New York City, Colby College is a change of pace that I look forward to experience these next four years. My long term goals include completing a novel, becoming a physician and being a professor. My goals may be lofty but your moral support will help me reach them. So, Thanks for reading.
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Noggins

Sorry dear readers and day in/day out followers for my absence. I have been away with concussion. The past week has been a whirlwind of catching up on missed work and getting my life back together.

Three weeks ago to the day, I hit my head. As it were, I got a concussion which it turns out is actually pretty big problem. I took an imPACT test in the health center, which determines how your brain is working. I thought I was in perfect condition, but it turns out I was not. The second time I did it, I realized that first time was way way harder than it should have been.

Regardless, I had to spend a week at home just chilling out. I couldn’t read. I couldn’t watch any screens. I was basically bored out of my gourd. I went for one to two walks per day and chowed down on food. I think it was the definition of boredom eating.

Luckily, when you get a concussion or any health issue that requires you going home, the dean emails your professors and you are okay to miss some classes. One of the nice things about having such small class sizes, is that when the dean emails your professor, the professor actually knows who you are. And furthermore, because you aren’t just one of 50 to 100 students in a class, you have a relationship with them, so they both care and understand your situation.

Of course, once I got back to school – things picked up again. I am supposedly concussion free. But I am chained to my schedule and back in the grind. Midterms abound and applications surround. But I’m back in blogging form – which I’m not sure is a form at all. So welcome back? I’ll be performing my duties bountifully from here on out.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Fall Break Escapades

When walking around campus over fall break one can’t help but imagine the cinematic ghost town movies. Except instead of tumbleweed, there are mounds upon mounds of foliage.  In fact the presence of squirrels become even more evident since they seem to outnumber humans on campus.

Even though there was some bumps along the road with the bulk of people returning home for break, there were some highlights.

It might even  seem like  that there is nothing to do on campus over fall break. On the contrary, fewer peers; fewer rules!

A common nighttime escapade my friends and I partake in is a test of courage. The pitter-patter of our feet as they crunch on branches during the dead of night as we venture into the depths of the arboretum can only be described as… pretty awesome. Although we sometimes try to scare others it was not scary at all with all our headlamps and phone lights travelling in unison.

As a “city kid” I had never truly seen the magnitude of stars in the sky before Colby. Stargazing while scrapped up and dirty from our trek, we followed (what we believed to be) the North Star along railroad tracks back to campus.

A truly romantic and memorable experience I will fondly look back on and look forward to on extended weekends.

We also of course took advantage of the lack of people. Whether it be blasting music in Cotter at midnight or watching movies  (and sometimes practicing dance choreography) in Diamond, we always had something to do.

 

About Tanvir

I am a first year student interested in the biological sciences. In addition to being a blogger, I am a research assistant in the biology department and a writer for the Colby Echo. In my free time I play table tennis and billiards. As someone born and raised in New York City, Colby College is a change of pace that I look forward to experience these next four years. My long term goals include completing a novel, becoming a physician and being a professor. My goals may be lofty but your moral support will help me reach them. So, Thanks for reading.
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Fun nights

If you’re into the social scene but not the party scene,  no need to worry, join the club.

There are weeks that you just don’t feel like getting dressed up and going out. Tonight, that was my friends and I.

After a brief period of milling about and pondering our nightly plans we went to a “party” of an a not so typical variety.

My friends and I went to an open microphone performance in the Mary Low Coffeehouse. A regular event in which Colby students share with their peers. Performances include comedy, music, and spoken word poetry.

It was a great chance to catch up with friends, make new ones and better understand the diversity of our student body.

Then it hit us, the bane of all college student’s existence, the midnight munchies.

Not to fear, the Jitney (student run taxi service) is here!

After arguing about our limited food choices we came to  a conclusion, fast food.

As we arrived at one of the places open this late, Dunkin Donuts, the cashier gave us a proposition.

If my friend Ben could perform ” a cool solo riff” on his guitar that he had from his killer open mic performance, we would get a discount.

And so some Tenacious D (look it up) chords began to ensue. Just like that, we had a 10% discount.

All in all it was a fun night. After midterm exams and between fall break, between times of high and low tension, a moderate chill night is exactly what we needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Tanvir

I am a first year student interested in the biological sciences. In addition to being a blogger, I am a research assistant in the biology department and a writer for the Colby Echo. In my free time I play table tennis and billiards. As someone born and raised in New York City, Colby College is a change of pace that I look forward to experience these next four years. My long term goals include completing a novel, becoming a physician and being a professor. My goals may be lofty but your moral support will help me reach them. So, Thanks for reading.
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The View Looking Down

While I was technically at inauguration this past weekend, I was also technically inside the library, on the third floor, as opposed to sitting on the quad. And, since Anh did such a marvelous job covering what it was like being on the right side of the convocation, I’m going to stick to my side. The side looking outwards and onwards. Isn’t it beautiful?:

While the inauguration went on in the rain, any other festivities that might have occurred were postponed to a later rain date, making this past Saturday the perfect day to check out all the ins and outs of the renovated Miller Library. Boys and girls, am I impressed! What I considered enough of a travesty to write about it in The Libel (the school satire paper) last spring has miraculously turned into a fantastic, new, state-of-the-art library.

Yes, many of the books have been moved. But now instead of a ridiculous amount of open spaced tables encouraging way too much conversation and not enough solitude and silence, the library has been set up in a way that makes me excited not just to do my homework, but find a little nook to read my Kindle.

So let’s work our way up the library from the windows to the walls, beginning in the basement, aka “the street”. The tables are still there to work late, late night or early, early morning, but one side of the stairs has been removed for renovations upstairs. Without context, I’d be upset. But once you walk up the stairs, the first floor now has an amazing addition. In a space where I literally can’t remember ever going to before, there is now a giant reading room with magazines, newspapers, giant volumes of books and long oak tables. It is well lit, and if you can get a spot before it fills up, I think it might be the place to be. Directly across from it, right next to archives and special collections, what once used to be an austere and old-world-esque reading room, there is now a “cordoned” off, well-lit study room that only the brave will find.

Now, into the actual library, there is a grand new entrance hallway with a massive help desk that leads into the first floor. The first floor hasn’t changed much, but now that I’m used to it, it’s fine for the conversation and group-work floor. Similarly the second floor is sort of a group/study/quiet floor that has been better sectioned off, but like the street’s renovations, isn’t that different or life-changing.

But the third floor? The one upon which I looked out on inauguration (on the classroom side of the library.) Finally, it’s back to “the real deal” Evander Holyfield silent study room it was born to be. There are rows of cubicles, tables that are sectioned off littered across the third floor like Emperor Qin’s Terra Cotta army. Desks for days! I couldn’t be happier. So come check it out yourself.

Now, I could give you pictures, but then that would ruin the surprise, so you should probably just visit the new Miller 2014 Library.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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APT’s

When you arrive at college, everyone older than you says in some sappy form or another that college is over in the blink of an eye. Or that you’ll be a senior sooner than you could even think. Well I’m here to tell you the hype is the real. I’m only a week into actual classes and I’m still wondering how it is I ended up on the top of Mayflower Hill in The Alfond Apartments.

 

Part of the perks of being a senior is improved living conditions. You enter, wide-eyed full of trepidation, usually into a double or triple in a dorm full of other freshmen or sophomores. Gradually you gain entrance to the most coveted rooms on or off campus such as the apartments. The Alfond Apartments are reserved solely for seniors except on the weekends when there is an influx including most of the campus body resembling Nantucket, Bar Harbor or the Jersey Shore during peak tourist season. Just as soon as they’ve come, they’re gone with (late) Sunday morning’s arrival.

 

Having lived off campus, I can safely say there are some pros and cons to the apartments. On campus, you are close to everything and can walk everywhere. Thus, you don’t have to wake up in the morning with a car and drive to school. At the same time, the apartments are literally on top of Mayflower Hill, so the walk back up requires a Nalgene and a pair of hiking boots. However, everyone has a pretty similar sized room (there are 4,5, and 6 man apartments), there is a nice living room area and a kitchenette. Unfortunately, if you like to cook, the apartments are a far cry from a house kitchen, but you can make it work. And maybe one morning you’ll wake up in the Alfond Apartments how the time could fly by so quickly. And if you’re lucky, you’ll have a patio right outside your room where you can go sit down and contemplate on top of Mayflower Hill.

 

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Barefoot Bubbly

The smell of champagne wafts up to the third floor of the library and into my nostrils like the scent of my mother cooking breakfast on a Sunday morning. I’m startled, alarmed and pleasantly surprised. I’ve yet to pass my sommelier test, but I can categorize the different beverages being blown about in the wind. Barefoot Bubbly. André. Nothing too fancy, just the types to get the job done.

I thought champagne on the steps had been shut down, but six weary revelers outside Miller Library are determined to save the night and maybe fight the break of dawn. They have finished their final classes at Colby College and find themselves sipping champagne on the steps.

I’d heard rumor of such a tradition in a class the other day. A professor of mine once smelled the same thing and came outside bemused to find every senior running towards Johnson Pond in the buff. The only thing clothing them was mud dripping from the pond.

Way back when there was a tradition called Champagne on the Steps. It occurred on the last Friday of spring semester for seniors. Champagne was served quite literally on the steps of Miller library. But after too much revelry and broken glass the tradition was shut down. And caput, just like that no more.

In this new age of 21st century society, traditions like this have ended. For better or for worse, they have also ended here at Colby. Obviously, the less hospital visits for stepping on broken glass the better. There is too much liability, too much danger and there was probably a bit too much fun. But for the six seniors sitting outside, they pay no heed to the end of traditions and celebrate their final class with some bubbly. Cheers.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
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Home away from Home — Dinner at Cito’s

It is tough to start college, and being in a new country does not make it any better. However, Cito Cruz knows the best way to cure homesickness is through the stomach. Every Friday, Cruz and his wife, Sue, will make enough home-cooked food to feed fifty , and drives international students and their friends to his home for a big meal. Some students will be deep in conversation and enjoying chicken teriyaki and miso soup, while others are playing games and laughing out loud. “There’s something about the house gives it a very homely atmosphere” explained Cruz.

Students know their ways around Cruz’s house; they would pull out the foldable table and chairs one they arrived, Cruz’s three-legged dog would be greeted and stroked; she had a content expressions that say, “Welcome back, old friends.” “Ladies first!” Cruz would shout when the food is ready, and students would hurry and grab the plates and folk and eagerly wait in line.

Cruz, who have been hosting these dinners around the world for more than thirty years, knows how tough it being an international student can be. “I was a foreign student myself long ago; nothing compares to [the crave of] food, hot sauce and rice.” Cruz was also in a host family, like many of Colby’s international students. His host family once drove 150 miles to take care of Cruz, who literally got sick from missing home; back then, a letter took at least two weeks to reach his family, and making a phone call was expensive. Cruz’s host family gave him the master bedroom and slept in the basement for a week. He loved his host family, and decided to share the same kindness with Colby’s international students. He became a host family when his family moved to Maine because of his wife’s career, and also because of his intentions to write and publishes books. He brought a house by a lake; one of his main considerations when he brought the house was that it needed to be big enough to accommodate the students he would invite.

Being a faithful Christian, Cruz see his actions as his devotion to God, which prompt him to love his neighbors as his own; also, with his children all off to college, cooking for the student is just like cooking for his children  once again.

“There’s something about food that bonds people together,” said Cruz. In Cruz’s house, you can see international students and American students working together to win a game of Pictionary. “For the international students, it [international dinner] makes them easier to simulate into the American culture; for the American students, it raises their awareness of other cultures,” said Cruz.

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Snowed In — Part 1: the adventures

Ah, snow.

When I am old and wrinkly, I will fondly remember Colby as the snow covered wonderland where students built snowman in JanPlan and little cardboard red hearts on Valentine. I will remember the warmth of hot chocolate on the Street, and tiny snowflakes that covered the roofs like powdered sugar on ginger bread houses. For now, I will struggle through the knee deep sludge to class while avoiding the icy slopes of death.

Colby is covered in snow around five months of the year. When spring rolls around, there will still be stubborn mounds of snow that has been seasoned to rock-hard ice bricks, refusing to melt away, as if judging your willingness to shed the large puffy coats and wearing sleeveless.

With snow comes lots of fun activities. I have heard tales of cross-country skiing (I have no clue what that is), sledding (it counts when I did it with lunch trays, right?), snow shoeing (that just sounds like what I do everyday to school, but made fancy), and (normal? regular?) skiing. Fun fact: I did skied once and it was amusing when you get the gist of it; when I was learning and skiing down the slope with the speed of a turtle fearing for a icy death, it was amusing to others. Especially the kids.

Being less of an outdoorsy person, I enjoy quieter, less deadly activities. I love going to Boston on the weekends to have hotpot in Chinatown with my friends; there is something soothing seeing beef and veggies and tofu and seafood bubbling in a delicious stew. Since it turns dark at around 5:00pm during the cold months, I usually could not fight the urge to curl up on my comfy chair (which I got in the Rescue Sale for $8) and read while nursing a hot cup of tea. Hot beverages are the God’s reward for freezing cold, so I indulge in hot chai, apple cider, coffee, tea, matcha latte, and everything else.

One of my favorite things to do is to take a hot mug of tea and walk to the bench in front of the Alumni Center in the middle of the night. Staring at the blue light of Miller reminds me of the beauty of Mayflower Hill, and memories over four years in Colby.

The second semester is always busy for me; I tend to overestimate my ability, or I like to think that  I am inherently a daredevil who loves a challenge. There are many sleepless nights, so perhaps my favorite winter moments are sitting in front of Runnals after a long night and watching the sky turns from Indian ink blue, to a rich royal purple, a fiery red, tangerine, and finally a crisp blue of a winter morning. The bird chimes and another Colby morning has broken, bringing another day of adventures.

 

 

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