Category Archives: Uncategorized

Bad Good Movie Weekend

I really need to get my priorities in order and stop procrastinating on my assignments, But if you happen to suffer from chronic time wasting as I do, here are some things you can do that I did.

What is the Best worst movie out there?

“Troll 2″ was the unanimous decision. I had never seen it before and after watching it I can definitely say it has some very skeptical special effects and surreal plot. We watched the movie in Lovejoy 100, a large lecture hall. The best part of the entire experience had to be right after the movie ended. Someone knocked on the door and in fear of getting int trouble (which there was no reason for) we dashed out the back as quickly as we could all the way back to our dorms. As we sat in my room discussing the movie my roommate barged in complaining why we didn’t open the door when he knocked. We’d ran out without realizing who has knocking. The experience was rather humorous for everyone that was not my roommate.

The following night we had a similar outing. My friends and I watched the Grand Budapest Hotel. The first good movie I had seen in a while. We came prepared this time with brie, crackers, and cheese.

Then judgement day came for me, Sunday. The day I had to do all my work. Spending 8 hours in Miller Library is not a fun day. The only notable thing I did other than study was attend the CCAK (Colby Cares About Kids) mentoring session. CCAK students are paired with a child and the two grow together over the years. An interesting experience I look forward to partaking in. Now if you’ll excuse me it is time to do my literature reading.

About Tanvir

I am a first year student interested in the biological sciences. In addition to being a blogger, I am a research assistant in the biology department and a writer for the Colby Echo. In my free time I play table tennis and billiards. As someone born and raised in New York City, Colby College is a change of pace that I look forward to experience these next four years. My long term goals include completing a novel, becoming a physician and being a professor. My goals may be lofty but your moral support will help me reach them. So, Thanks for reading.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Papers, Papers, Everywhere

A few days ago I read a really excellent article about tips for productivity. The author argues that schedules are much better than to-do lists because schedules force you to be realistic about the amount of things you’ll be able to accomplish. This advice couldn’t be more applicable to my week.

Over fall break, I had planned to finish all my short-term and long-term assignments, which included reading two books and writing three essays and an outline. Despite working consistently between family events, all I wound up accomplishing was reading the two books. Then I planned to write the three essays over the next three days. Again, I was overambitious. I finished the first essay the first night, but to do so I had to stay up late, which led to me accidently falling asleep the next day, which left me with only enough time to do the 120 pages of reading for my next day’s class. (I had for some reason thought this reading would take hardly any time at all. Unsurprisingly to no one but myself, it did take time. Quite a bit, in fact.)

Then it was Friday, and I spent the afternoon writing an outline for an essay before spending the evening avoiding the Chance concert with my friends. So now it’s Saturday, and I’m once again planning over-ambitiously; on my to-do list is to write an essay and an outline by the end of the day, leaving tomorrow open to study for my midterm. Here’s to hoping I get it all done. I believe strongly that work expands to fill the amount of time you have to do it, so I’m sure I’ll soon see a rise in productivity.

About Catherine

Hi. My name is Catherine and I'm a sophomore English major, currently enjoying my first year at Colby. I was born and raised in Berwick, Maine, an exotic little town near the New Hampshire border. I am involved in Let's Get Ready, which provides free SAT prep for local high school students, and Inklings Magazine, which is a literary journal here at Colby. Like all English majors, I enjoy reading and writing, and Virginia Woolf. A hobby more specific to myself is that every Christmas I spend far too much time making elaborate snowflakes. It is a very seasonal form of artistic expression, but it is also, unfortunately, the only one in which I have any talent. Thanks for reading.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Quebec Trip!!!

After all the mid-terms and essays, I finally had a nice break! Colby organised a trip for mostly international students to go to Quebec City for 3 days and 2 nights. It was amazing!!! I hope I could stay for longer though.

The views and architecture there amazed me every second. My friend, seoyoung and I didnt go to the waterfall, but we heard that it was stunning and beautiful. Perhaps next year we will go there again! But I asked others to send me to photos so you can see the photos in the photo gallery!!!

On the first day, we went near the harbour, and visited the art Museum there, it wasn’t a big one but we had a plenty of time so we did go. The streets were already decorated with Halloween, and there is even a shop that sells christmas decoration (you can see it in my gallery :) )

On the 2nd day, a small group of us decided to go to an Indian restaurant which is supposed to be 1 km, but we ended up walking for 45 minutes. When we got there, we waited another 45 minutes for the food to come. There is nothing we can do except for chatting and playing games. Haha, thanks to the Indian restaurant, we bond with each other. Since most of us are international students and it is also a mixture of different class year, I get to know more people from the globe!! Talking about our own experience as an international student is so much fun as well.

About Stephanie

I am a freshman at Colby College, originally from Hong Kong. For the last two years of high school, I studied at Li Po Chun United World College (LPCUWC). I am very interested in economics and economic policy. Presumably, it will be my major. Living in a business hub since I was born, I am always very curious about how international and local businesses find opportunities in a tiny city. Music is very important in my life, too. I have been playing piano since I was four and I also play the clarinet. I wish to learn Jazz piano at Colby and the professors here are amazing.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Say “Yes”

My best friend from back home, Laney, once gave me some simple, yet wise advice: “say no when you don’t want to, say yes when you can’t think why not.” This idea has stuck with me for a long time. I’ve come to firmly believe that one of the secrets to happiness, and also to making progress in our lives, is saying yes (with discretion, of course).

There are times in our lives when we are faced with decisions, and we must give a clear answer – yes, or no. Sometimes these decisions are small:

“Yes, I’d love another cookie.”

Or big:

“No, I won’t marry you.”

Regardless, these questions require answers. Of course, sometimes the answer is simply “no”, but when I am faced with a decision where I get that see-saw feeling of uncertainty, I try to make myself say yes. “Yes” is a door that can be opened to amazing possibilities and closed up again if we change our minds, while “no” is just a wall – solid, permanent, and without openings. For me, saying yes has become a way of life.

At Colby, saying yes to things and being generally open to new experiences has brought me so much happiness and it has helped me to cultivate a life here. Within the first week of being at college, I quickly noticed that opportunities were constantly jumping out at us. Invitations to hear a guest lecturer speak, movie nights, free yoga classes, pie eating contests, trips to New York City, hikes (the list goes on)… and then there were the clubs. Colby has over 100 different clubs to choose from, and practically anything you could possibly be interested in is a club (there’s even Napping Club). At the Club Expo in September, I literally signed up for 24 different clubs. Okay, I know that this was excessive, but it ties into my concept of saying yes. There was no way that I was actually going to commit myself to all of the clubs that I signed up for, but by putting my name down on their email lists, I was giving myself the opportunity to later “say yes.”

In the end, I was happy that I had signed up for so many clubs, because some clubs that I signed up for randomly, not really intending to join (like Ballroom Dance Club, for instance), became some of my favorite things I do on campus.

At the very start of school, I also made the decision to “say yes” and to audition for the One Week Musical that happens the first week of every school year at Colby. The One Week, essentially, is when a group of Colby students comes together to put up a full length musical with just one week of preparation. This year the musical was Kiss Me, Kate. At first I was uncertain about whether or not I should do it, because it seemed like a huge undertaking, but I went through with it and got to sing the whole opening number by myself, learned a bunch of fun dance numbers, and made a ton of new friends. Two of the girls that I met through the One Week, Kathryn and Isabel, have remained two of my closest friends on campus. If I hadn’t said yes to the opportunity to do the musical, I may never have met them and my life wouldn’t be half as fun without them.

Two other examples of “yes” in action:

I was walking back from dinner one night when some girls from my theater class ran over to me and said “Katie! You should audition for the Powder and Wig fall season!” Powder and Wig is the student run theater group on campus. I decided to “say yes”, and I walked into the audition 10 minutes before it ended, and by the end of the night, I had been cast in a play about robots called R.U.R.

I was eating lunch at the Spanish lunch table one day and one of the Spanish language assistants had seen me sing in the musical, so she asked me if I would want to be on the Spanish team for a music contest in which all of the different language departments sing and dance in their language. I said yes to this opportunity and have met so many cool people and have gotten to practice my Spanish a ton and sing (two of my favorite things to do!)

So, my general message here is, say yes. Take opportunities that come your way, even if you don’t know what will come from them. Try new things even if they scare you. You hold the magic word that opens the doors to possibility – use it.

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

- H. Jackson Brown

 

 

About Katie

I’m Katie and I’m from the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts. I'm a freshman, I live in Foss, and I love Colby! I am currently considering majoring in Spanish or psychology (or both). Some of my favorite things include: acting, singing, playing the piano, writing, fuzzy socks, chai lattes, lying in the grass, Broadway show tunes, Jane Austen, hedgehogs, TedTalks, baby animals, Gilmore Girls reruns, blue Freeze Pops, the ocean, and hugs. I’m so excited to continue my adventures here at Colby and share them with you all.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Anthropology 101: Combatting Ethnocentrism

From my last post, you may notice my anthropological skills coming into action. I really enjoy observing other people (not in a creepy way) and trying to decipher the reasoning behind their action. As you may have guessed from previous posts, I am a big believer in the nature perspective of sculpting people. I feel like the environment has such a big affect on your actions! Perhaps this is because I value other people’s opinions….sometimes maybe too much. However, Social Psychology and Cultural Anthropology made me aware of society’s effect on you.

Ethnocentrism is the belief that one’s culture is superior and evaluating other people and cultures based off of your own. People have a tendency to look at other people’s habits, traditions, and beliefs as “different” and thus somehow worse just because it does not match their own. I’m not sure how it became so engrained to degrade something just based off of it being different. I think people are insecure and find it threatening for anything to be different. Perhaps it’s just the desire for consistency that we homogenize everything. Nonetheless, just because something is different does not mean that it is wrong or bad.

Cultural Anthropology made me realize that this is how people act. But the first step to combatting ethnocentrism is being aware that you are doing it. That is why I loved Anthropology. I enjoyed learning about different cultures and understanding their different lifestyles not as weird but simply different. In addition my professor was beyond kind. She put in an extra effort in order to ensure that each student understood the material. In addition, she adjusted her lectures and assignment to correspond with the needs of her students. Although lectures were important, she included movies and discussions every week. She listened to every student’s troubles and comments and invited critiques. At the start of the semester, she wanted each student to meet with her during office hours simply to talk and get to know each other. Because only by understanding each other can you really defeat ethnocentrism.

 

About Anh Uong

My name is Anh (yes it is very hard to pronounce). I am now a sophomore in AMS (sweetest dorm on campus) still ready to take on the world. Traveling from the far reaches of Massachusetts, I have really enjoyed Maine and the beautiful landscape that accompanies it. I am interested in everything from math to writing, which makes selecting a major difficult, but that's why I am here at a liberal arts college. Recently I have decided on majoring in Computer Science and Global Studies. Around campus, I can be spotted with a ukulele, a stack of notebooks, and a smile.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Noggins

Sorry dear readers and day in/day out followers for my absence. I have been away with concussion. The past week has been a whirlwind of catching up on missed work and getting my life back together.

Three weeks ago to the day, I hit my head. As it were, I got a concussion which it turns out is actually pretty big problem. I took an imPACT test in the health center, which determines how your brain is working. I thought I was in perfect condition, but it turns out I was not. The second time I did it, I realized that first time was way way harder than it should have been.

Regardless, I had to spend a week at home just chilling out. I couldn’t read. I couldn’t watch any screens. I was basically bored out of my gourd. I went for one to two walks per day and chowed down on food. I think it was the definition of boredom eating.

Luckily, when you get a concussion or any health issue that requires you going home, the dean emails your professors and you are okay to miss some classes. One of the nice things about having such small class sizes, is that when the dean emails your professor, the professor actually knows who you are. And furthermore, because you aren’t just one of 50 to 100 students in a class, you have a relationship with them, so they both care and understand your situation.

Of course, once I got back to school – things picked up again. I am supposedly concussion free. But I am chained to my schedule and back in the grind. Midterms abound and applications surround. But I’m back in blogging form – which I’m not sure is a form at all. So welcome back? I’ll be performing my duties bountifully from here on out.

About Jeb Waters

I'm a philosophy major and administrative science minor from Hancock, Maine. I play on the varsity lacrosse team, am the director of operations of the student-run investment fund Mayflower Hill Capital, and I run the school's satire paper. This summer, I worked in business development for my family's artisan jam company, Blueberet.
This entry was posted in Student Life, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Old Home, New Home

As I drove my tiny Nissan Sentra home for Fall Break on Friday for what seemed like forever (the usual 5 hour drive to my house in Lenox, MA took more like 7 hours because of holiday weekend traffic), I was gliding further and further away from Colby and back into a place that is very comfortable and familiar. The second my car passed into Berkshire County territory, memories flooded my mind, associations I have with different buildings and sidewalks and benches and roads of home. It felt lovely to be home, and I was warmly welcomed by my two younger siblings (minus my older sister), my parents, my dog Pepper and a delicious home-cooked dinner. I felt relaxed and content – I had returned to the place I know best.

But, at the same time, it felt weird to be home. When I packed for college back in August, I brought most of my clothes and belongings with me, leaving only a few shirts that are speckled with pills from washing them too many times, jeans that don’t fit, hand-me-down sweaters with pit-stains, socks with holes in the heals… you get the idea. So, preparing to go home for break I packed a lot – as if I were going to stay at a hotel. And that is sort of how it felt to sleep at home again, like being in a hotel, my bed freshly made with clean sheets, the floor completely cleared and vacuumed, my duffle bag thrown carelessly on the floor and still packed since I would only be there a few nights. When I woke up in the morning, it took me a few seconds to even realize where I was.

It was interesting to realize that being home, the place where I’ve spent most of my life, could already feel so unusual to me, that after just a couple months at Colby, sleeping in my dorm room and eating in the dining halls has started to feel like my normal, every day life. I enjoyed my time at home and did all of the things that I’ve missed doing, like baking chocolate chip pumpkin bread and breaking open a pomegranate in a bowl of water and eating the seeds with a spoon like cereal, seeing my high school friends, and playing board games around the fireplace with my family. However, as much as it was nice to just relax and eat and lie around in my big warm bed, I knew that the way I spent those few days at home was just something temporary, not my real life. Now, my real life is at Colby, and it was refreshing to realize that I have a place, a role and a purpose in the community here. It’s a great feeling to be needed somewhere, to feel like people are depending on you and expecting your presence. Returning to campus after break, I was excited to feel needed, and it felt like coming back to a second home where familiar faces and familiar surroundings await me.

I arrived on campus at around 3 p.m. on Tuesday, starving, and since none of the dining are open at that hour, I drove to Selah Tea Cafe in Waterville to get lunch. Selah is a favorite go-to coffee shop of many Colby students, but they also have delicious soups, salads and sandwiches. I enjoyed my turkey, bacon, tomato and maple pesto sandwich as I caught up on some homework, smiling at how good it felt to be back at my new home.

Selah sandwich :)

Our dorm window in Foss decorated for Fall!

Me, really excited to get my flu shot in the Spa (get your flu shot!!! #yayforbeinghealthy!)

A picture of my room in Foss. On the other side of the room, my roommate Hannah’s bed, desk and dresser are all arranged symmetrically to mine (our attempt at having some feng shui in the room).

About Katie

I’m Katie and I’m from the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts. I'm a freshman, I live in Foss, and I love Colby! I am currently considering majoring in Spanish or psychology (or both). Some of my favorite things include: acting, singing, playing the piano, writing, fuzzy socks, chai lattes, lying in the grass, Broadway show tunes, Jane Austen, hedgehogs, TedTalks, baby animals, Gilmore Girls reruns, blue Freeze Pops, the ocean, and hugs. I’m so excited to continue my adventures here at Colby and share them with you all.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

The Secrets of Walking on the Grass

As you walk around campus you have a choice. While getting to your destination, do you choose to to walk on the paths or cross the grass? I notice so many people traveling on the paths, even if it may not be the fastest way. Every once in awhile though, you’ll find someone who bravely walks across the grass, so nonchalantly. I believe there is a lot to be said from this simple action.

Why do people not walk on the grass? The grass seems almost sacred, as if walking on it will be breaking some law. I remember in Princess Diaries, Mia walked on the grass and the speaker blared yelling at her to get off the grass in a slew of languages. Society has set some precedence that makes people believe that walking on the grass is a bad thing. Perhaps people think that walking on the grass will kill it, so they decide against it from an environmental perspective. But I believe choosing to walk on the grass tells a lot about a person.

Are you the type of person that stays on the paths that society has literally laid down for you? Or are you breaking free from the system and walk on the grass, despite society’s potential bad connotations? Are you a conformer or a hipster? (I understand that using the term hipster is very controversial and has multiple definitions. Here I use the term hipster as someone who goes against society, not necessarily the definition society uses as a “cool”, wears clothes from the 80′s type person. Pretty much, a nonconformist.) I think the grass-walkers don’t care about society’s rules and just do their own thing. On the other hand, the path-walkers follow the “mainstream”.

Well I say, we should be more like the grass-walkers. Don’t let what society lays down for you define who you are. Just be yourself, do you own thing, and let the rest work itself around you. Let’s walk on the grass!

About Anh Uong

My name is Anh (yes it is very hard to pronounce). I am now a sophomore in AMS (sweetest dorm on campus) still ready to take on the world. Traveling from the far reaches of Massachusetts, I have really enjoyed Maine and the beautiful landscape that accompanies it. I am interested in everything from math to writing, which makes selecting a major difficult, but that's why I am here at a liberal arts college. Recently I have decided on majoring in Computer Science and Global Studies. Around campus, I can be spotted with a ukulele, a stack of notebooks, and a smile.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Gratitude

A couple of years ago I was visiting my friend who lived on a beautiful lakefront property. The sun was setting, and the last rays of light turned the lake into a sea of diamonds. You had a perfect view through massive picture windows, near which was positioned a large and cozy couch. I said, “Wow. You must watch the sunset every day.” She laughed and said, “Nope. It’s a good idea in theory, but after a while you get used to it.”

It’s been a popular subject in pop-psych books, this phenomenon of getting used to all the fortunate things that have happened to us. We’ve all heard Daniel Gilbert’s study where he measured the happiness of a group of lottery winners and amputees and found that three years later, their happiness had returned to pre-incident levels. This actually formed the basis of my reasoning for applying to only two colleges my senior year of high school: I figured I’d be similarly contented anywhere I went, so I might as well not apply to really selective schools and possibly take the spot away from someone whose happiness really would depend on his or her acceptance. There are a lot of inconsistencies with this logic, but they didn’t occur to my underdeveloped prefrontal cortex at the time.

To make a long story short, I transferred. I spent the months between applying and receiving my acceptance letter making a thousand bargains with God, saying I’d ever want anything again so long as I got into Colby. And lo and behold, I got in.

The initial high stayed for quite a while, dimming towards the end of summer only to be renewed once I got on campus. Everything was so expensive and luxurious, and I admit I felt a little out of place. It’s a very small percentage of people who can feel completely at home relaxing on a leather couch in front of a magnificently carved marble statue, as is par for the course when studying at Miller Library. I’m still obsessed with how tasty the food is. I have a bowl of fresh fruit every morning to make up for the exclusively canned assortment that was offered at my old school. Class discussions are on such a high level that I have to remind myself that my classmates are also just undergrads and that I too can analyze the gendered nature of sacrifice through a postcolonial lens.

(Not strictly related, but it always makes me smile.)

So in these first two months a least, I’ve found it very easy to stave off the tendency to take things (Colby, in this case) for granted. Sometimes when I feel overwhelmed by all the papers I have to write or I miss my best friend Allie whom I left behind at my old school, I read my old diary entries and remember everything that nostalgia made me forget–the frustration of not being challenged, the constant, heart-wrenching pangs of regret, the alienation that came with caring about academics when most of my classmates did not. Then I remember once again how grateful I am to be here.

About Catherine

Hi. My name is Catherine and I'm a sophomore English major, currently enjoying my first year at Colby. I was born and raised in Berwick, Maine, an exotic little town near the New Hampshire border. I am involved in Let's Get Ready, which provides free SAT prep for local high school students, and Inklings Magazine, which is a literary journal here at Colby. Like all English majors, I enjoy reading and writing, and Virginia Woolf. A hobby more specific to myself is that every Christmas I spend far too much time making elaborate snowflakes. It is a very seasonal form of artistic expression, but it is also, unfortunately, the only one in which I have any talent. Thanks for reading.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments

Fall Break Escapades

When walking around campus over fall break one can’t help but imagine the cinematic ghost town movies. Except instead of tumbleweed, there are mounds upon mounds of foliage.  In fact the presence of squirrels become even more evident since they seem to outnumber humans on campus.

Even though there was some bumps along the road with the bulk of people returning home for break, there were some highlights.

It might even  seem like  that there is nothing to do on campus over fall break. On the contrary, fewer peers; fewer rules!

A common nighttime escapade my friends and I partake in is a test of courage. The pitter-patter of our feet as they crunch on branches during the dead of night as we venture into the depths of the arboretum can only be described as… pretty awesome. Although we sometimes try to scare others it was not scary at all with all our headlamps and phone lights travelling in unison.

As a “city kid” I had never truly seen the magnitude of stars in the sky before Colby. Stargazing while scrapped up and dirty from our trek, we followed (what we believed to be) the North Star along railroad tracks back to campus.

A truly romantic and memorable experience I will fondly look back on and look forward to on extended weekends.

We also of course took advantage of the lack of people. Whether it be blasting music in Cotter at midnight or watching movies  (and sometimes practicing dance choreography) in Diamond, we always had something to do.

 

About Tanvir

I am a first year student interested in the biological sciences. In addition to being a blogger, I am a research assistant in the biology department and a writer for the Colby Echo. In my free time I play table tennis and billiards. As someone born and raised in New York City, Colby College is a change of pace that I look forward to experience these next four years. My long term goals include completing a novel, becoming a physician and being a professor. My goals may be lofty but your moral support will help me reach them. So, Thanks for reading.
This entry was posted in Student Life, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.
Comments