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ShowColby: A January in Bermuda

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This January Geology Professor Bruce Rueger took 13 students to Bermuda. The course,  Geology of Bermuda, began with two weeks in the classroom, followed by 10 days in Bermuda. We studied how organisms, including humans, and sedimentary processes have shaped Bermuda, and the interrelationships between geology and biology. On the small, 23-mile long island we explored pitch-black caves, scuba dIved through coral reefs, met with established researchers, and had countless other memorable activities. We stayed at the Biological Research Station (BIOS) on the northern part of the island. Our day started at 8 a.m. with chef George making us eggs and sausage and ended with late night tea on the beach.

For me the trip highlighted the importance of experiential learning. Utilizing the senses as a mechanism for learning verified, in a concrete sense, that we're part of reality. In Bermuda, we held poisonous jelly-fish, cut open cacteous fruit, and brushed palm leaves through our fingers. What better way to learn about an exotic place so different from Maine? This trip was a great way to appreciate the geologic and biological aspects of Bermuda.

Dhokela Yzeiraj
Bronx, New York
Lehman High School
Major: Geology
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A January in Bermuda

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Dhokela Yzeiraj
Bronx, New York
Lehman High School
Major: Geology

This January Geology Professor Bruce Rueger took 13 students to Bermuda. The course,  Geology of Bermuda, began with two weeks in the classroom, followed by 10 days in Bermuda. We studied how organisms, including humans, and sedimentary processes have shaped Bermuda, and the interrelationships...   Read More

Student Lens
  Before leaving, we spent two weeks in the classroom learning about the formation of the island and its many different species.


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